13th Annual South Ayrshire Rotary Beach Clean Success

13th Annual South Ayrshire Rotary Beach Clean Success

What a magnificent turnout and performance at the recent Big Rotary Beach Clean, coordinated by Ayr Rotary Club with support from the other clubs of Troon, Prestwick, Alloway and Girvan. This was the biggest one ever and included for the first time the beaches at South Harbour, Ayr and at Curragh, north of Girvan, in addition to those at Troon, Prestwick, Newton, Seafield, Doonfoot, Greenan, Craig Tara, Bracken Bay, Dunure, North Croy, Dowhill, Dipple, Girvan and Ballantrae. More than 15 miles of coastline were tackled by over 300 willing and cheerful volunteers who collected the equivalent of 625 large bags of rubbish and other debris. The mile-long beach at Curragh generated the largest collection because this had not been cleaned previously. However, the good news is that all other beaches showed a reduction from previous years which suggests that the annual beach clean is making a big impression and a progressively improving situation. Although it was not practical this year to separate plastic litter from other types of marine detritus the proportion of plastic is very high and was last year estimated at 93%. Next year it is hoped that an attempt can be made to segregate the main waste material types as they are collected, which should allow more effective recycling. Although there is, year-on-year, less large material as the annual clean ups improve the general situation, a dozen or so drums of used engine sump oil dumped at sea were removed. A sizeable number of these drums have been recovered over the past thirteen years, all between Girvan and Heads of Ayr, and these, unfortunately, may be...
Skelmorlie Secret Bunker, near Largs

Skelmorlie Secret Bunker, near Largs

  Skelmorlie Secret Bunker is a fully restored Royal Observer Corps underground monitoring post which was built in 1964 as part of a nationwide UK Cold War civil defence programme, in order to detect and report on the effects of a Nuclear Attack. It is the only free admission, fully restored monitoring post in the West of Scotland and only one of two in Scotland normally available for public access (the other is in Arbroath) since the official stand-down of the posts in 1991. In 2017 a visitor portacabin was installed on the site to provide a reception point and small museum, this being adjacent to Stage 12 of the Ayrshire Coastal...
ACP Social Evening a Great Success

ACP Social Evening a Great Success

Well, thanks to Alistair and Bob, we all had a great time last Friday evening with around 40 Pathminders and friends turning out for the party. The warm atmosphere inside the Bracken Bar was a great antidote to the gale and lashing rain outside on the windswept Heads of Ayr. Greeted with a free glass of fizzy (for the lucky ones who weren’t driving) the evening got off to a cracking start as folk chatted about all sorts of things, not necessarily to do with walking and pathminding. In the background, thanks to Charlie Steele, a superb rolling show of ACP scenery and wild life pictures illustrated the many natural attractions of the ACP. Hungry stomachs were then amply satisfied by a lavish finger buffet of warm foods prepared by the Bracken Bar staff, and for which we must thank David and Una Semple who both participated in and contributed to the social side of the evening. Then it was time for the Alistair Tyre show (well quiz actually). Seven teams of 5 or 6 struggled to retrieve bits of useless information from the depths of their now-relaxed minds. Questions were as varied as the quizzers themselves and the final sheet of questions was compiled from the official ACP Guidebook. The answer to the question of the length of the ACP (including detours) was hotly debated afterwards with some folk resorting to mobile phones for measurements to check. However the answer was 100 miles and who are we to argue with the path’s creator, Jimmy Begg? Guess whose team won the quiz!!!! Gillian delivered a well-deserved vote of thanks...

RIP Willie Watters 1935 – 2019

The Ayrshire Coastal Path is sorry to announce the passing of one of its founding members, Ayr Rotarian Willie Watters, who died recently at the age of 83. A keen, life-long walker, following his retirement as Chief Works Analyst at ICI Explosives, Ardeer, Willie became a weel kent figure as an OIR Walk Leader for many years. From a farming background, he was also a very practical man with the tools, not only on the Coastal Path, but also as a Kirk elder and Fabric Convenor at Newton Wallacetown Church. He was also instrumental in setting up our first Ayr Rotary Website. For this work, he was elected Rotarian of the Year by our Club. His walking experience, practical skills, and companionship were a huge help to Jimmy Begg when setting up the Coastal Path from 2005-2008, when they tramped its whole length together, identifying the route, and meticulously recording the locations for all the signage, kissing gates, and small bridges. Subsequently, Willie served on the ACP Management Board till 2018 and was a stalwart on our work parties – and his annual Beach Clean patch at Bracken Bay – till about 2015, when his health started to deteriorate. But he still kept a keen interest in what we were doing – even when in hospital recently. He enjoyed Rotary, but over the past year poor health greatly limited his opportunity to attend. All those who enjoy the Coastal Path, have profited from Willie’s great contribution to its success. RIP Willie and many thanks from us all....

Pathminders Report for 2018

Here is the Report from Trail Manager, Jimmy Begg Hi all, This is my end of year message to thank everyone for the fantastic amount of work done in 2018 and to sign you all up again for 2019 – which hopefully will not be so strenuous, but just as interesting and enjoyable.  2018 was the busiest and most successful and productive year we’ve had since the Ayrshire Coastal Path opened in 2008, thanks totally to the magnificent efforts of a hugely increased volunteer workforce. In 2009, with a dozen Rotarian volunteers and little or no equipment apart from a scythe and loppers, we managed 160 man-hours (123 hours Maintenance and 27 hours of Improvements). In 2018, ten years on, with a workforce of 51 (comprising 17 Rotarians and 34 non-Rotarian volunteers), we managed a total of 1021 man-hours (351 hours Maintenance and 670 hours on Improvements). The great engineering and logistical feat of Fisherton Gully now stands as testament to all your skills and hard work, and is hugely appreciated by the walkers who use the path. Be proud of what you’ve done here. Also be proud of the routine maintenance work we continue to do, from strimming and lopping to replacement of signage and minor repairs – all of which keep the ACP in good trim and fettle for the thousands who use it each year. In 2019, we hope to finish off the last few steps at the Gully, and then proceed to some Path restoration and signage at Bracken Bay. Following this we hope to construct a new bridge down at Balkenna Hut (the Black...

Work party achievement – 30/11/18

Great morning’s work at Fisherton Gully last week – helped by a bonus from Nature’s Bounty.- Storm Diana had floated a huge log that had been uselessly stranded for years 100m south, and washed it up on the tideline just below the Gully steps. While having our tea break after carting loads of big beach stones up the path to build stone steps, we thought we’d try and shift the trunk clear of high water mark. But with skilled use of crowbars, brains, and brute strength, six of us managed to roll it ten metres up the shore right to the Path, where it now makes a fab seat for walkers. Then we went on to complete the bottom half of the stone-step path....
Test

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close