FOOTBRIDGE CLOSURE, RIVER IRVINE

Walkers should note that the footbridge across the River Irvine at Low Green is currently closed until mid September and a short diversion is in place. Please follow the red ‘pedestrian’ signage which is in place, using the Marress Road bridge...

Warning of Possible Road/Path closures at Turnberry on 13-14 July

Unofficial word has come from South Ayrshire Council (who are also in the dark on this matter due to lack of information from higher authority) that the security involved in a possible presidential visit by Donald Trump on 13 or 14 July, may lead to temporary closure to the public of the Links Lodge beach track, Turnberry Beach, and the ACP route across Turnberry Golf Course. In addition the A719 road from Turnberry to Maidens may also be closed. Walkers may wish to alter their plans for these days. If going north, to avoid the busy A77T, from Turnberry a minor road past Laigh and High Drumdow farms branches north past High Park Farm to re-join the A77T 1km south of Kirkoswald. About 0.5km north of this junction, another minor road on the left runs NW to re-join the A719, which leads back to Maidens to re-join the ACP. This detour will add around 3 miles (5Km) to the day’s...

Bulls in Curragh Bullpens till mid-June

Both bullpens on the foreshore opposite Burnside and Curragh Farms are currently occupied by a number of hefty Charolais bulls, which usually go out to the heifers in mid-June. So, until both pens are eventually vacated, walkers in either direction should bypass them by descending on to the adjacent foreshore and walking quietly along the beach till clear of this...

Update on Fisherton Gully project

After 10 years, the wooden steps have begun to rot and the gravel dressing has been largely washed away, making this part of the Path difficult and even unsafe in wet conditions. We decided to make this the major task over the winter. We started the project at the end of October 2017, and although progress has been good, we still have a considerable amount of work to do to complete it. The work involves: Diverting field run off water into new ditches Installing French drains to keep water off the path Removing all old risers and steps and installing new ones Laying membrane, topping with one inch whin chips This is a steep gully, and the materials have to be man-handled down to where they are required. Various methods and contraptions have been devised to achieve this. The whin chips arrive in one tonne bulk bags, and are hand-filled into manageable 15kg plastic sacks.  Up to ten of these are then put back into a large bag and a “gravity drop” system using ropes and pulleys is used to lower to the site. Also a huge thanks to Alan and Maureen Currie of Fisherton Farm for helping deliver the chips to the top of the gulley by tractor. The job should be completed by early spring but in the meantime please be careful if you are walking. The route is still passable, but is extremely slippy when wet.      ...

Flooded Glenapp Estate Track at top of Turf

        On the Glenapp section at the top of Turf Hill, walkers may find a couple of 20m long dubs (mega-puddles!) filling the full width of the estate track. After heavy rain (and it’s now Autumn), these might be well over boot height and require a detour either side to get past. Until the Estate can free up machinery from other more pressing jobs, to backfill the track, we would suggest perhaps traversing along the fence side, as there is always something to hold on to – and there is a deep area on the west side that might swallow the unwary up to their...

The work never stops…

On 22 August, an impromptu, small party of two (Jimmy and Ron) did some tidying work along the shore between Fisherton and Drumbain Gullies. Main tasks were spraying the weeds on the Fisherton steps down the gully, repainting and clearing the sea radish and marram grass around the nearly invisible waymarker cairn, plastic litter picking (two bagfuls), and stockpiling old fishboxes for later soft path bottoming purposes. Carrying on to Drumbain burn, Jimmy collected plant-head and seed specimens from near the new bridge to allow him to carry out some botanical experiments known only to himself! Victorian plant hunters – eat your hearts...

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